Pictures

Some articles on pictures:

Vestron Pictures
... Vestron Pictures was a film studio and distributor of the late 1980s, and a division of Austin O ... Vestron also had a genre film division, Lightning Pictures, a spin-off of Vestron's Lightning Video ...
TriStar Television
... American television production company that was launched in 1986 by TriStar Pictures (the studio which was then-currently owned by Columbia Pictures and HBO CBS ... By December 1987, Tri-Star Pictures was 51% owned by Columbia Pictures Entertainment with Coca-Cola owning 49% and Tri-Star Television was combined with ... Columbia Pictures and Tri-Star Pictures (and their respective television units) were sold in 1989 to Sony of Japan ...
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment - Selected Films
... films directly produced by PFE were Endless Love (1981) (distributed by Universal Pictures) An American Werewolf in London (1981) (distributed by Universal Pictures) Missing (1982 ...
Triumph Films
... known as Triumph Releasing Corporation) is a division of Sony Pictures Entertainment geared towards theatre and direct-to-video film production and distribution ... originally founded in 1982 as a joint venture between Columbia Pictures and the French company Gaumont to distribute foreign films in the US ... Birthday, The Ambulance, Brainscan, Magic in the Water (co-released by TriStar Pictures), The Golden Laws, Steamboy and SuperBabies Baby Geniuses 2 ...

Famous quotes containing the word pictures:

    If the king is in the palace, nobody looks at the walls. It is when he is gone, and the house is filled with grooms and gazers, that we turn from the people, to find relief in the majestic men that are suggested by the pictures and the architecture.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Ellie: A soul is a very expensive thing to keep: much more so than a motor car. Shotover: Is it? How much does your soul eat? Ellie: Oh, a lot. It eats music and pictures and books and mountains and lakes and beautiful things to wear and nice people to be with.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    As for pictures and museums, that don’t trouble me. The worst of going abroad is that you’ve always got to look at things of that sort. To have to do it at home would be beyond a joke.
    Margaret Oliphant (1828–1897)