Physics - Core Theories

Core Theories

Further information: Branches of physics, Outline of physics

Though physics deals with a wide variety of systems, certain theories are used by all physicists. Each of these theories were experimentally tested numerous times and found correct as an approximation of nature (within a certain domain of validity). For instance, the theory of classical mechanics accurately describes the motion of objects, provided they are much larger than atoms and moving at much less than the speed of light. These theories continue to be areas of active research, and a remarkable aspect of classical mechanics known as chaos was discovered in the 20th century, three centuries after the original formulation of classical mechanics by Isaac Newton (1642–1727).

These central theories are important tools for research into more specialized topics, and any physicist, regardless of his or her specialization, is expected to be literate in them. These include classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, electromagnetism, and special relativity.

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Core Theories - Difference Between Classical and Modern Physics
... While physics aims to discover universal laws, its theories lie in explicit domains of applicability ... yet been unified with the other fundamental descriptions several candidate theories of quantum gravity are being developed ...

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