Personal Life

Personal life is the course of an individual's life, especially when viewed as the sum of personal choices contributing to one's personal identity. It is a common notion in modern existence—although more so in more prosperous parts of the world such as Western Europe and North America. In these areas, there are service industries which are designed to help people improve their personal lives via counselling or life coaching.

Read more about Personal Life:  History, Sociology, Leisure Activities, Privacy

Other articles related to "personal, personal life, life":

Joseph Conrad - Merchant Navy - British Voyages - Master
... Outcast of the Islands (1896) he also appears in the autobiographical volume, A Personal Record (1912), where Conrad writes "If I had not got to know Almayer pretty well it is almost certain there would ... Vidar and very busy whenever in harbour." Neither the pathetic Almayer of A Personal Record nor the tragic Almayer of Almayer's Folly have much in common with the ... Given Conrad's negligible personal acquaintance with the peoples of the Malay Archipelago, why does this area loom so large in his early work? (Leaving aside The Rescue, whose completion was ...
John, King Of England - John As King - Personal Life
... John's personal life impacted heavily on his reign ... noting that chroniclers also reported John's personal interest in the life of St Wulfstan of Worcester and his friendships with several senior clerics, most especially with Hugh of Lincoln, who was later ...
Ray Milland - Personal Life
... During the 1954 shooting of their film Dial M for Murder Milland and his co-star, Grace Kelly, were reported to have had an affair which almost destroyed both their careers ... The scandal was kept secret with the aid of the movie's studio, Warner Bros ...

Famous quotes containing the words life and/or personal:

    One cannot be a good historian of the outward, visible world without giving some thought to the hidden, private life of ordinary people; and on the other hand one cannot be a good historian of this inner life without taking into account outward events where these are relevant. They are two orders of fact which reflect each other, which are always linked and which sometimes provoke each other.
    Victor Hugo (1802–1885)

    What had really caused the women’s movement was the additional years of human life. At the turn of the century women’s life expectancy was forty-six; now it was nearly eighty. Our groping sense that we couldn’t live all those years in terms of motherhood alone was “the problem that had no name.” Realizing that it was not some freakish personal fault but our common problem as women had enabled us to take the first steps to change our lives.
    Betty Friedan (20th century)