Personal Information Managers

Personal Information Managers

A personal digital assistant (PDA), also known as a palmtop computer, or personal data assistant, is a mobile device that functions as a personal information manager. PDAs are largely considered obsolete with the widespread adoption of smartphones.

Nearly all current PDAs have the ability to connect to the Internet. A PDA has an electronic visual display, enabling it to include a web browser, all current models also have audio capabilities enabling use as a portable media player, and also enabling most of them to be used as mobile phones. Most PDAs can access the Internet, intranets or extranets via Wi-Fi or Wireless Wide Area Networks. Most PDAs employ touchscreen technology.

The first "PDA" was released in 1984 by Psion, the Organizer II. Followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991, which began to resemble the more familiar PDA style. It also had a full keyboard.

The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.

In 1996, Nokia introduced the first PDA with full mobile phone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. The Communicator spawned a new category of PDAs: the "PDA phone", now called "smartphone". Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996.

Read more about Personal Information Managers:  Typical Features, Operating Systems of PDAs, Automobile Navigation, Ruggedized PDAs, Medical and Scientific Uses, Educational Uses

Other articles related to "personal information managers":

Desk Accessory - Personal Information Managers
... Early personal information managers, such as Norton Desktop and Borland's SideKick, provided pop-up calculator, alarm, calendar and other functions for single-tasking operating systems like MS-DOS using terminate and ...

Famous quotes containing the words managers, personal and/or information:

    We also have to make sure our children know the history of women. Tell them the rotten truth: It wasn’t always possible for women to become doctors or managers or insurance people. Let them be armed with a true picture of the way we want it to be.
    Anne Roiphe (20th century)

    A man’s personal defects will commonly have with the rest of the world precisely that importance which they have to himself. If he makes light of them, so will other men.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    As information technology restructures the work situation, it abstracts thought from action.
    Shoshana Zuboff (b. 1951)