Perpendicular Gothic

Some articles on perpendicular gothic, perpendicular, gothic:

Seend - Parish Church
... west tower, which predates the late-15th-century Perpendicular Gothic nave ... The Perpendicular Gothic north aisle is also late 15th century, paid for by the clothier John Stokes (died 1498) ... The font is Perpendicular Gothic ...
English Gothic Architecture - Perpendicular Gothic - Notable Examples
... Some of the earliest examples of the Perpendicular Period, dating from 1360, are found at Gloucester Cathedral, where the masons of the cathedral would seem to have been far in advance of those in other towns the fan-v ... The Perpendicular style was less often used in the Gothic Revival than the Decorated style, but major examples include the rebuilt Palace of Westminster (i.e ...
Hampton Court Palace - History - Tudor Period
... was in a harmonious transition from domestic Tudor, strongly influenced by perpendicular Gothic, to the Italian Renaissance classical style ... Perpendicular Gothic owed nothing historically to the Renaissance style, yet harmonised well with it ... the design precedent set by Wolsey perpendicular Gothic-inspired Tudor with restrained Renaissance ornament ...
Aston Tirrold - Churches - Parish Church
... built in the 12th century, but the chancel was rebuilt in the Early English Gothic style in the first half of the 13th century ... The Decorated Gothic east window of the chancel is also 14th century ... However, it is Perpendicular Gothic which suggests it is no earlier than the middle of the 14th century ...
The Nave Choir - Architecture - Cathedral - Perpendicular Gothic
... Seth Derwall completed the south transept to a Perpendicular Gothic design, as seen in the transomed windows of the clerestory ...

Famous quotes containing the word gothic:

    It is perhaps the principal admirableness of the Gothic schools of architecture, that they receive the results of the labour of inferior minds; and out of fragments full of imperfection ... raise up a stately and unaccusable whole.
    John Ruskin (1819–1900)