Pascal (programming Language) - Resources - Compilers and Interpreters

Compilers and Interpreters

Several Pascal compilers and interpreters are available for general use:

  • Delphi is Embarcadero's (formerly Borland/CodeGear) flagship rapid application development (RAD) product. It uses the Object Pascal language (termed 'Delphi' by Borland), descended from Pascal, to create applications for the windows platform. The .NET support that existed from D8 through D2005,D2006 and D2007 has been terminated, and replaced by a new language (Prism, which is rebranded Oxygene, see below) that is not fully backwards compatible. In recent years unicode and generics were added (D2009,D2010,Delphi XE), and the last release (XE2) made the already existing namespace enhancements mandatory. (which makes maintenance of code that has to work with other versions hard)
  • Free Pascal is a multi-platform compiler written in Object Pascal (and is self-hosting). It is aimed at providing a convenient and powerful compiler, both able to compile legacy applications and to be the means of developing new ones. It is distributed under the GNU GPL, while packages and runtime library come under a modified GNU LGPL. Apart from compatibility modes for Turbo Pascal, Delphi and Mac Pascal, it also has its own procedural and object-oriented syntax modes with support for extended features such as operator overloading. It supports many platforms and operating systems.
  • Turbo51 is a free Pascal compiler for the 8051 family of microcontrollers, with Turbo Pascal 7 syntax.
  • Oxygene (formerly known as Chrome) is an Object Pascal compiler for the .NET and Mono platforms. It was created and is sold by RemObjects Software, and recently by Embarcadero as the backend compiler of Prism.
  • Kylix was a descendant of Delphi, with support for the Linux operating system and an improved object library. It is no longer supported. Compiler and IDE are available now for non-commercial use.
  • GNU Pascal Compiler (GPC) is the Pascal compiler of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC). The compiler itself is written in C, the runtime library mostly in Pascal. Distributed under the GNU General Public License, it runs on many platforms and operating systems. It supports the ANSI/ISO standard languages and has partial Turbo Pascal dialect support. One of the more painful omissions is the absence of a 100% Turbo Pascal-compatible string type. Support for Borland Delphi and other language variations is quite limited, except maybe for Mac Pascal, the support for which is growing fast.
  • DWScript aka DelphiWebScript, is an interpreter created by Matthias Ackermann and Hannes Hernler in 2000. Current version runs a dialect of Object Pascal largely compatible with Delphi, but also supports language constructs elements introduced in Prism. DWScript code can be embedded into Delphi applications similar to PascalScript, compiled into standalone application using SimpleMobileStudio or compiled into JavaScript code and placed on a web page.
  • Dr. Pascal is an interpreter that runs Standard Pascal. Notable are the "visible execution" mode that shows a running program and its variables, and the extensive runtime error checking. Runs programs but does not emit a separate executable binary. Runs on DOS, Windows in DOS window, and old Macintosh.
  • Dr. Pascal's Extended Pascal Compiler tested on DOS, Windows 3.1, 95, 98, NT.
  • Virtual Pascal was created by Vitaly Miryanov in 1995 as a native OS/2 compiler compatible with Borland Pascal syntax. Then, it had been commercially developed by fPrint, adding Win32 support, and in 2000 it became freeware. Today it can compile for Win32, OS/2 and Linux, and is mostly compatible with Borland Pascal and Delphi. Development was canceled on April 4, 2005.
  • P4 compiler, the basis for many subsequent Pascal-implemented-in-Pascal compilers, including the UCSD p-System. It implements a subset of full Pascal.
  • P5 compiler, is an ISO 7185 (full Pascal) adaption of P4.
  • Turbo Pascal was the dominant Pascal compiler for PCs during the 80s and early 90s, popular both because of its powerful extensions and extremely short compilation times. Turbo Pascal was compactly written and could compile, run, and debug all from memory without accessing disk. Slow floppy disk drives were common for programmers at the time, further magnifying Turbo Pascal's speed advantage. Currently, older versions of Turbo Pascal (up to 5.5) are available for free download from Borland's site.
  • IP Pascal Implements the language "Pascaline" (named after Pascal's calculator), which is a highly extended Pascal compatible with original Pascal according to ISO 7185. It features modules with namespace control, including parallel tasking modules with semaphores, objects, dynamic arrays of any dimensions that are allocated at runtime, overloads, overrides, and many other extensions. IP Pascal has a built-in portability library that is custom tailored to the Pascal language. For example, a standard text output application from 1970's original Pascal can be recompiled to work in a window and even have graphical constructs added.
  • Pascal-XT was created by Siemens for their mainframe operating systems BS2000 and SINIX.
  • PocketStudio is a Pascal subset compiler and RAD tool for Palm OS and MC68xxx processors with some own extensions to assist interfacing with the Palm OS API. It resembles Delphi and Lazarus with a visual form designer, an object inspector and a source code editor.
  • MIDletPascal – A Pascal compiler and IDE that generates small and fast Java bytecode specifically designed to create software for mobiles
  • Vector Pascal Vector Pascal is a language for SIMD instruction sets such as the MMX and the AMD 3d Now, supporting all Intel and AMD processors, and Sony's PlayStation 2 Emotion Engine.
  • Morfik Pascal allows the development of Web applications entirely written in Object Pascal (both server and browser side).
  • WDSibyl – Visual Development Environment and Pascal compiler for Win32 and OS/2
  • PP Compiler, a compiler for Palm OS that runs directly on the handheld computer
  • CDC 6000 Pascal compiler The source code for the first (CDC 6000) Pascal compiler.
  • Pascal-S – "Pascal-S: A Subset and Its Implementation", N. Wirth in Pascal – The Language and Its Implementation, by D.W. Barron, Wiley 1979.
  • AmigaPascal – AmigaPascal, a free Pascal-Compiler for Amiga-Computer.

A very extensive list can be found on Pascaland. The site is in French, but it is basically a list with URLs to compilers; there is little barrier for non-Francophones. The site, Pascal Central, a Mac centric Pascal info and advocacy site with a rich collection of article archives, plus links to many compilers and tutorials, may also be of interest.

Read more about this topic:  Pascal (programming Language), Resources

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    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)