Parliament Hill

Parliament Hill (French: Colline du Parlement), colloquially known as The Hill, is an area of Crown land on the southern banks of the Ottawa River in downtown Ottawa, Ontario. Its Gothic revival suite of buildings serves as the home of the Parliament of Canada and contains a number of architectural elements of national symbolic importance. Parliament Hill attracts approximately 3 million visitors each year.

Originally the site of a military base in the 18th and early 19th centuries, development of the area into a governmental precinct began in 1859, after Bytown was chosen by Queen Victoria as the capital of the Province of Canada. Following a number of extensions to the parliament and departmental buildings and a fire in 1916 that destroyed the Centre Block, Parliament Hill took on its present form with the completion of the Peace Tower in 1927. Since 2002, an extensive $1 billion renovation and rehabilitation project has been underway throughout all of the precinct's buildings; work is not expected to be complete until after 2020.

Read more about Parliament HillHistory, Grounds and Name, Parliament Buildings, Statues and Monuments

Other articles related to "parliament hill, parliament hills, hill":

Parliament Hill, London - Activities
... Parliament Hill is renowned as a cross-country running venue and hosted the 2009 English National Championships ... The 2012 English National Cross Country Championships will also be staged at Parliament Hills ... The hill has been used as a location in several films, including The Wedding Date in 2005, and Run Fatboy Run in 2007 ...

Famous quotes containing the words hill and/or parliament:

    Mahomet made the people believe that he would call a hill to him, and from the top of it offer up his prayers for the observers of the Law. The people assembled; Mahomet called the hill to come to him again and again; and when the hill stood still, he was never a whit abashed, but said, If the hill will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet will go to the hill.
    Francis Bacon (1561–1626)

    He felt that it would be dull times in Dublin, when they should have no usurping government to abuse, no Saxon Parliament to upbraid, no English laws to ridicule, and no Established Church to curse.
    Anthony Trollope (1815–1882)