Palm Kernel Oil

Palm kernel oil is an edible plant oil derived from the kernel of the oil palm Elaeis guineensis. It should not be confused with the other two edible oils derived from palm fruits: coconut oil, extracted from the kernel of the coconut, and palm oil, extracted from the pulp of the oil palm fruit.

Palm kernel oil, coconut oil, and palm oil are three of the few highly saturated vegetable fats; these oils give the name to the 16-carbon saturated fatty acid palmitic acid that they contain.

Palm kernel oil, which is semi-solid at room temperature, is more saturated than palm oil and comparable to coconut oil. It is commonly used in commercial cooking because of its relatively low cost, and because it remains stable at high cooking temperatures and can be stored longer than other vegetable oils.

Read more about Palm Kernel Oil:  History, Research Institutions, Nutrition, Uses

Other articles related to "palm, oil, palm kernel oil, kernel, oils":

Palm Oil
... Palm oil is an edible plant oil and is derived from the mesocarp (reddish pulp) of the fruit of the oil palms, primarily the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, and to a lesser extent from the American ... It is not to be confused with palm kernel oil derived from the kernel of the same fruit, or coconut oil derived from the kernel of the coconut palm (Cocos ... The differences are in color (raw palm kernel oil lacks carotenoids and is not red), and in saturated fat content Palm mesocarp oil is 41% saturated, while Palm Kernel oil and Coconut oil are 81% and 86 ...
Palm Kernel Oil - Uses
... Splitting of oils and fats by hydrolysis, or under basic conditions saponification, yields fatty acids, with glycerin (glycerol) as a byproduct ... fatty acids are a mixture ranging from C4 to C18, depending on the type of oil/fat ... Resembling coconut oil, palm kernel oil is packed with myristic and lauric fatty acids and therefore suitable for the manufacture of soaps, washing powders and ...

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