Pachypodium - Genus Characteristics - Adaptive Features - Pachycaul Trunks

Pachycaul Trunks

Pachypodium trunks and branches are thickened with water-storing tissue. Plants must rely on the food and water stored in their thickened trunks during seasonal or intermittent drought when leaves have been shed and no water is available from the substrate. In addition to the lower surface-to-volume ratio which aides in water retention, the thickened trunks and branches can also possess photosynthetic surface tissue to allow nutrient synthesis even when leaves are not present.

Some species of pachypodium have developed geophytic pachycaul trunks, or trunks that are beneath the soil's surface. These geophytic trunks are caudexes, enlarged stems or trunks that store water. They should not be mistaken for roots, because the enlargement occurs above the point where the roots branch off the main axis of the trunk.

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Other articles related to "pachycaul trunks, trunks":

Pachypodium - Genus Characteristics - Adaptive Features - Pachycaul Trunks
... Pachypodium trunks and branches are thickened with water-storing tissue ... must rely on the food and water stored in their thickened trunks during seasonal or intermittent drought when leaves have been shed and no water is available from the substrate ... ratio which aides in water retention, the thickened trunks and branches can also possess photosynthetic surface tissue to allow nutrient synthesis even when leaves are not present ...

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