Orthography - Types

Types

The writing systems on which orthographies are based can be divided into a number of types, depending on what type of unit each symbol serves to represent. The principal types are logographic (with symbols representing words or morphemes), syllabic (with symbols representing syllables), and alphabetic (with symbols roughly representing phonemes). Many writing systems combine features of more than one of these types, and a number of detailed classifications have been proposed. For a full discussion, see Writing system: Functional classification of writing systems.

Read more about this topic:  Orthography

Other articles related to "types, type":

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... Claw-types set quickly in most seabeds and although not an articulated design, they have the reputation of not breaking out with tide or wind changes, instead slowly ... Claw types have difficulty penetrating weedy bottoms and grass ... ratio and generally have to be oversized to compete with other types ...
Types of Graphemes
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... Attempts to introduce types date back to the 1980s, and as of 2008 there are still attempts to extend Prolog with types ... Type information is useful not only for type safety but also for reasoning about Prolog programs ...

Famous quotes containing the word types:

    As for types like my own, obscurely motivated by the conviction that our existence was worthless if we didn’t make a turning point of it, we were assigned to the humanities, to poetry, philosophy, painting—the nursery games of humankind, which had to be left behind when the age of science began. The humanities would be called upon to choose a wallpaper for the crypt, as the end drew near.
    Saul Bellow (b. 1915)

    He types his laboured column—weary drudge!
    Senile fudge and solemn:
    Spare, editor, to condemn
    These dry leaves of his autumn.
    Robertson Davies (b. 1913)

    Our major universities are now stuck with an army of pedestrian, toadying careerists, Fifties types who wave around Sixties banners to conceal their record of ruthless, beaverlike tunneling to the top.
    Camille Paglia (b. 1947)