Optional Protocol To The Convention On The Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (OP-CEDAW) is an international treaty which establishes complaint and inquiry mechanisms for the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Parties to the Protocol allow the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women to hear complaints from individuals or inquire into "grave or systematic violations" of the Convention. The Protocol has led to a number of decisions against member states on issues such as domestic violence, parental leave and forced sterilization, as well as an investigation into the systematic killing of women in the Mexican city of Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua.

The Protocol was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 6 October 1999, and in force from 22 December 2000. As of 2013, the Protocol has 80 signatories and 104 parties.

Read more about Optional Protocol To The Convention On The Elimination Of All Forms Of Discrimination Against Women:  Genesis, Summary, Reservations and Membership, Individual Complaints, Inquiries, Impact and Criticism, See Also

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