Opposed Civil Rights

Some articles on opposed civil rights, opposed, civil rights, rights:

National Woman's Party - Civil Rights Act of 1964
... the House Rules Committee he was a conservative who strongly opposed civil rights laws for blacks ... it a cynical attempt to defeat the bill by someone opposed to both civil rights for blacks and women, or did he support women's rights and was ... was trying to embarrass northern Democrats who opposed civil rights for women because the clause was opposed by labor unions ...
Howard W. Smith/Comments - Congressional Career - Civil Rights
... Smith used his power as chairman of the Rules Committee to keep much civil rights legislation from coming to a vote on the House floor ... When the Civil Rights Act of 1957 came before Smith's committee, Smith said "The Southern people have never accepted the colored race as a race of ... Smith delayed passage the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ...

Famous quotes containing the words civil rights, rights, opposed and/or civil:

    ...I was confronted with a virile idealism, an awareness of what man must have for manliness, dignity, and inner liberty which, by contrast, made me see how easy living had made my own group into childishly unthinking people. The Negro’s struggles and despairs have been like fertilizer in the fields of his humanity, while we, like protected children with all our basic needs supplied, have given our attention to superficialities.
    Sarah Patton Boyle, U.S. civil rights activist and author. The Desegregated Heart, part 1, ch. 19 (1962)

    The government of the United States is a device for maintaining in perpetuity the rights of the people, with the ultimate extinction of all privileged classes.
    Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933)

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)

    Civil servants and priests, soldiers and ballet-dancers, schoolmasters and police constables, Greek museums and Gothic steeples, civil list and services list—the common seed within which all these fabulous beings slumber in embryo is taxation.
    Karl Marx (1818–1883)