Open Source Politics

Open Source Politics

Open-source political campaigns, open-source politics, or Politics 2.0, is the idea that social networking and e-participation technologies will revolutionize our ability to follow, support, and influence political campaigns. Netroots evangelists and web consultants predict a wave of popular democracy as fundraisers meet on MySpace, YouTubers crank out attack ads, bloggers do opposition research, and cell-phone-activated flash mobs hold miniconventions in Second Life.

Typically these terms describe short-term limited-life efforts to achieve a specific goal. Longer term projects involving embedded institutions (of journalism, parties, government itself) are more often called "open-source governance" projects. All open politics share some very basic assumptions however including the belief that online deliberation can improve decisions.

Read more about Open Source PoliticsOrigins of The Term, Similar Terms, Objections To and Usage of The Term, Impact of Open-source Politics, Optimists, Impact of Open-source Politics, Skeptics

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Open Source Politics - Impact of Open-source Politics, Skeptics
... of the Columbia School of Journalism, who has said open-source politics may eventually be co-opted by political parties ...

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