One Missed Call (2004 Film) - Critical Reception

Critical Reception

One Missed Call has received mixed reviews by critics, who generally cite it as being too similar to previous J-horror films such as Ring and Ju-on: The Grudge.

Entertainment Weekly wrote, "One Missed Call is so unoriginal that the movie could almost be a parody of J-horror tropes", yet "Miike, for a while at least, stages it with a dread-soaked visual flair that allows you to enjoy being manipulated." L.A. Weekly called it "a prolonged, maddening, predictable—yet curiously pleasurable—descent into incomprehensibility." Philadelphia Inquirer stated that "Miike, whose work usually veers into more surreal, experimental terrain, uses creepy-crawly juxtaposition, grisly violence, and dark humor to create a nightmare scenario for the text-message generation."

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