(Oh Baby Mine) I Get So Lonely

"(Oh Baby Mine) I Get So Lonely" is a popular song. It was written by Pat Ballard and was published in 1953.

The biggest hit version was done by The Four Knights in 1954.

Anne Shelton with Ken Mackintosh and his orchestra recorded it in London on March 3, 1954. The song was released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10680.

Several other country and pop artists also recorded the song, including Johnnie & Jack, whose version was a #1 country hit in 1954, and The Statler Brothers, whose version was a #2 country hit in 1983.

The same year, Dutch singer/comedian Andre van Duin released it as De Heidezangers; in the accompanying video he portrayed a three-piece amateur-band of piano, guitar and bass. The latter musician famously turned "Oh baby mine" into the speech-impedimental "Ik ssspeel de basss" ("I play the bass").

The song was referenced in an early episode of "The Bob Newhart Show".

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(Oh Baby Mine) I Get So Lonely

"(Oh Baby Mine) I Get So Lonely" is a popular song. It was written by Pat Ballard and was published in 1953.

The biggest hit version was done by The Four Knights in 1954.

Anne Shelton with Ken Mackintosh and his orchestra recorded it in London on March 3, 1954. The song was released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10680.

Several other country and pop artists also recorded the song, including Johnnie & Jack, whose version was a #1 country hit in 1954, and The Statler Brothers, whose version was a #2 country hit in 1983.

The same year, Dutch singer/comedian Andre van Duin released it as De Heidezangers; in the accompanying video he portrayed a three-piece amateur-band of piano, guitar and bass. The latter musician famously turned "Oh baby mine" into the speech-impedimental "Ik ssspeel de basss" ("I play the bass").

The song was referenced in an early episode of "The Bob Newhart Show".

Famous quotes containing the word lonely:

    Taking men into the union is just the kindergarten of their education and every force is against their further education. Men who live up those lonely creeks have only the mine owners’ Y.M.C.As, the mine owners’ preachers and teachers, the mine owners’ doctors and newspapers to look to for their ideas. So they don’t get many.
    Mother Jones (1830–1930)