Norwegian Railway

Some articles on norwegian railway, norwegian, railways, railway:

NSB Class 86 - History
... This includes one unit at the Norwegian Railway Museum three motor units and one trailer at stationed at Eina Station used on the heritage Valdres Line two twin units stationed at Rise Station and ... Two Class 91 units have been preserved by the Norwegian Railway Club, one on the Krøderen Line and one at Marienborg ...
Norwegian National Rail Administration
... The Norwegian National Rail Administration (Norwegian Jernbaneverket) is a government agency responsible for owning and maintaining the Norwegian railway network, including the track ... Safety oversight is the duty of the Norwegian Railway Inspectorate, while numerous operating companies run trains on the lines the largest being the state owned passenger company Norges ... The administration operates all railways in Norway, except tramways and rapid transit ...
Norsk Museumstog
... The Norwegian Heritage Trains (NMT) is doing restoration, preservation and operation of Classic Trains at the normal gauge part of the Norwegian railway network ... is solely used for the preservation of Norwegian railway history so that the coming generations will be allowed to experience and learn transport by train of the 19th and 20th ... Railway museums and heritage railways in Norway Museums Norwegian Railway Museum Bergen's Electric Tramway Lommedalen Line Norwegian Heritage Trains Oslo Tramway Museum Trondheim Tramway Museum ...
Norwegian State Railways - History - 1996 To Present
... On 1 December 1996 the largest structural change in Norwegian railway history in the 20th century occurred ... created government agency Jernbaneverket while a new Norwegian Railway Inspectorate was created to supervise all railway operations in the country ... NSB was renamed NSB BA and created as a limited company, wholly owned by the Norwegian Ministry of Transport and Communications ...

Famous quotes containing the word railway:

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)