North Carolina South

Some articles on south, north carolina:

Classification Of Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas - Canada, Greenland, United States, and Northern Mexico - Southeastern Woodlands
... northwestern Florida Apalachicola, Creek Confederacy, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina Atakapa (Attacapa), Louisiana west coast and Texas southwestern coast Akokisa, Texas southeast. 12,000 BCE—4500 BCE Nottaway, Virginia, North Carolina Occaneechi (Siouan), Virginia Oconee, Georgia, Florida Ofo, Arkansas and Mississippi, eastern Tennessee Okchai (Ogchay), central Alabama Okelousa, Louisiana ...
Indigenous Peoples Of The Southeastern Woodlands - List of Indigenous Peoples of The Southeastern Woodlands
... northwestern Florida Apalachicola, Creek Confederacy, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina Atakapa (Attacapa), Louisiana west coast and Texas. 12,000 BCE—4500 BCE Nottaway, Virginia, North Carolina Occaneechi (Siouan), Virginia Oconee people, Georgia, Florida Ofo, Arkansas and Mississippi ...

Famous quotes containing the words south, north and/or carolina:

    Whenever I’m asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one. To be able to recognize a freak, you have to have some conception of the whole man, and in the South the general conception of man is still, in the main, theological.
    Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964)

    Exporting Church employees to Latin America masks a universal and unconscious fear of a new Church. North and South American authorities, differently motivated but equally fearful, become accomplices in maintaining a clerical and irrelevant Church. Sacralizing employees and property, this Church becomes progressively more blind to the possibilities of sacralizing person and community.
    Ivan Illich (b. 1926)

    I hear ... foreigners, who would boycott an employer if he hired a colored workman, complain of wrong and oppression, of low wages and long hours, clamoring for eight-hour systems ... ah, come with me, I feel like saying, I can show you workingmen’s wrong and workingmen’s toil which, could it speak, would send up a wail that might be heard from the Potomac to the Rio Grande; and should it unite and act, would shake this country from Carolina to California.
    Anna Julia Cooper (1859–1964)