North Asia

North Asia or Northern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the Asian portion of Russia. The Phillips Illustrated Atlas of the World 1988 defines it as being most of the former USSR, the part that is to the east of the Ural Mountains. A definition pre-dating the USSR is an 1882 one by Keane and Temple, who defined it as "the two great administrative divisions of West and East Siberia, whose capitals are Omsk and Irkutsk respectively". It was, according to them "one vast political system, comprising nearly one-third of the whole continent, and, with a few trifling exceptions, directly administered by Russia".

Read more about North Asia:  Demographics, Geography

Other articles related to "north asia, asia, north":

East Asian People - North Asia
... For the most part, North Asia is considered to be made up of the Asian part of Russia solely ... North Asia is geographically the northern extremenity of East Asia and the physical characteristics of its native inhabitants generally resemble that of East ... There are roughly 40 million people In Asia ...
North Asia - Geography - Geomorphology
... See also Geology of Asia The geomorphology of Asia in general is imperfectly known, although the deposits and mountain ranges are well known ... The Eurasian Plate and the North American Plate meet across the neck of Alaska, following the line of the Aleutian Trench, rather than meeting at the Bering ... Northern Asia is built around the Angara Shield, which lies between the Yenisey River and the Lena River ...

Famous quotes containing the words asia and/or north:

    I believe that the fundamental proposition is that we must recognize that the hostilities in Europe, in Africa, and in Asia are all parts of a single world conflict. We must, consequently, recognize that our interests are menaced both in Europe and in the Far East.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    Exporting Church employees to Latin America masks a universal and unconscious fear of a new Church. North and South American authorities, differently motivated but equally fearful, become accomplices in maintaining a clerical and irrelevant Church. Sacralizing employees and property, this Church becomes progressively more blind to the possibilities of sacralizing person and community.
    Ivan Illich (b. 1926)