North American Fur Trade

The North American fur trade was the industry and activities related to the acquisition, trade/ exchange, and sale of animal furs in the North American continent. Aboriginal peoples in Canada and Native Americans in the United States of different regions traded among themselves in the Pre-Columbian Era, but Europeans participated in the trade beginning from the time of their arrival in the New World and extended its reach to Europe. The French started trading in the 16th century, the English established trading posts on Hudson Bay in present-day Canada in the 17th century, and the Dutch had trade by the same time in New Netherland. The 19th-century North American fur trade, when the industry was at its peak of economic importance, involved the development of elaborate trade networks and companies.

The fur trade became one of the main economic ventures in North America attracting, at various times, competition among the French, British, Dutch, Spanish, and Russians. Indeed in the early history of the United States, capitalizing on this trade, and removing the British stranglehold over it, was seen as a major economic objective. Many Native American societies across the continent came to depend on the fur trade as their primary source of income. By the mid-1800s, however, changing fashions in Europe brought about a collapse in fur prices. The American Fur Company and some other companies failed. Many Native communities were plunged into long-term poverty and consequently lost much of the political influence they once had.

Read more about North American Fur Trade:  Origins, New France in The 17th Century, British and French Competition, Indian Response To French-English Competition - Over Exploitation and Depletion of Beavers, The English Colonies, Social and Cultural Impact, Modern Day, See Also

Other articles related to "north american fur trade, fur trade, trade, american":

North American Fur Trade - See Also
... New France portal Fur Trade Beaver hat Deerskin trade Economic history of Canada Economic history of the United States British colonization of the Americas French colonization of the Americas ...
The American Prisoner
... The American Prisoner is a novel written by Eden Phillpotts, published in America in 1904 and adapted into a film in 1929 ... woman who lives at Fox Tor farm, and an American captured during the American Revolutionary War and held at the prison at Princetown on Dartmoor ...

Famous quotes containing the words north american, trade, fur, north and/or american:

    We might hypothetically possess ourselves of every technological resource on the North American continent, but as long as our language is inadequate, our vision remains formless, our thinking and feeling are still running in the old cycles, our process may be “revolutionary” but not transformative.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    I am cozily ensconced in the balcony of my face
    Looking out over the whole darn countryside, a beacon of satisfaction
    I am. I’ll not trade places with a king. Here I am then, continuing but ever beginning
    My perennial voyage....
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)

    How coyote got his
    ratty old fur coat
    bits of old fur
    the sparrows stuck on him
    with dabs of pitch.
    That was after he lost his proud original one in a poker game.
    Leslie Marmon Silko (b. 1948)

    By the North Gate, the wind blows full of sand,
    Lonely from the beginning of time until now!
    Trees fall, the grass goes yellow with autumn.
    Li Po (701–762)

    I am so tired of taking to others
    translating my life for the deaf, the blind,
    the “I really want to know what your life is like without giving up any of my privileges
    to live it” white women
    the “I want to live my white life with Third World women’s style and keep my skin
    class privileges” dykes
    Lorraine Bethel, African American lesbian feminist poet. “What Chou Mean We, White Girl?” Lines 49-54 (1979)