Normal - Psychology and Social Sciences

Psychology and Social Sciences

  • Normality (behavior), conformance to an average
  • Norm (sociology), social norms, expected patterns of behavior studied within the context of sociology
  • Normal goods in economics
  • Normal backwardation
  • Norm, a statistical concept in psychometrics

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Famous quotes containing the words psychology and, sciences, psychology and/or social:

    A writer must always try to have a philosophy and he should also have a psychology and a philology and many other things. Without a philosophy and a psychology and all these various other things he is not really worthy of being called a writer. I agree with Kant and Schopenhauer and Plato and Spinoza and that is quite enough to be called a philosophy. But then of course a philosophy is not the same thing as a style.
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    Psychology has nothing to say about what women are really like, what they need and what they want, essentially because psychology does not know.... this failure is not limited to women; rather, the kind of psychology that has addressed itself to how people act and who they are has failed to understand in the first place why people act the way they do, and certainly failed to understand what might make them act differently.
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    Anthropologists have found that around the world whatever is considered “men’s work” is almost universally given higher status than “women’s work.” If in one culture it is men who build houses and women who make baskets, then that culture will see house-building as more important. In another culture, perhaps right next door, the reverse may be true, and basket- weaving will have higher social status than house-building.
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