Noh - Plays

Plays

The current repertoire consist of approximately 250 plays, which can be divided according to a variety of schemes. The most common is according to content, but there are several other methods of organization.

Read more about this topic:  Noh

Other articles related to "plays, play":

The Country Wife - Background
... Reflecting the atmosphere of the Court, these plays celebrate a lifestyle of sensual intrigue and conquest, especially conquest that served to ... he created a sensation with The Country Wife, greeted as the bawdiest and wittiest play yet seen on the English stage ... career (1671–1676) he would borrow plotlines and techniques from French plays, particularly Molière ...
Noh - Plays - Some Famous Plays
... For a more comprehensive list, see List of Noh plays (A–M) N–Z ... Plays with a separate article are listed here ...
Yoiko - Members
... Plays the boke ... popularity in Akihabara in recent years due to his show Game Center CX, in which he plays through retro games ... Plays the tsukkomi ...
Noh - Roles
... In plays where the shite appears first as a human and then as a ghost, the first role is known as the maeshite and the later as the nochishite ... Kyōgen (狂言) perform the aikyōgen (相狂言) interludes during plays ... Kyōgen actors also perform in separate plays between individual noh plays ...

Famous quotes containing the word plays:

    The form of act or thought mattered nothing. The hymns of David, the plays of Shakespeare, the metaphysics of Descartes, the crimes of Borgia, the virtues of Antonine, the atheism of yesterday and the materialism of to-day, were all emanation of divine thought, doing their appointed work. It was the duty of the church to deal with them all, not as though they existed through a power hostile to the deity, but as instruments of the deity to work out his unrevealed ends.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    Self-interest speaks all sort of languages, and plays all sort of roles—even that of disinterest.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)

    Man is neither angel nor beast, and the unfortunate thing is that he who would play the angel plays the beast.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)