Nicene Creed

The Nicene Creed (Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is the creed or profession of faith (Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Πίστεως) that is most widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene ( /ˈnaɪsiːn/) because, in its original form, it was adopted in the city of Nicaea (İznik in what is now Turkey) by the first ecumenical council, which met there in the year 325.

The Nicene Creed has been normative for the Anglican Church, the Church of the East, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Roman Catholic Church including the Eastern Catholic Churches, the Old Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church and many Protestant denominations, forming the eponymous mainstream definition of Christianity itself in Nicene Christianity.

The Apostles' Creed, which in its present form is later, is also broadly accepted in the West, but is not used in the East. One or other of these two creeds is recited in the Roman Rite Mass directly after the homily on all Sundays and Solemnities (Tridentine Feasts of the First Class). In the Byzantine Rite Liturgy, the Nicene Creed is recited on all occasions, following the Litany of Supplication.

In the Roman Catholic Church, the Nicene Creed is part of the profession of faith required of those undertaking important functions within the Church.

For current English translations of the Nicene Creed, see English versions of the Nicene Creed in current use.

Read more about Nicene Creed:  Nomenclature, History, Ancient Liturgical Versions, English Translations

Other articles related to "nicene creed, creed, nicene":

Eastern Orthodox – Roman Catholic Theological Differences - Extant Disputes As Seen By Orthodox Theologians - Trinity - Western Acceptance of The Filioque
... groups generally include it when reciting the Nicene Creed ... in 381and they do not demand that others too should use it when saying the Creed ... the phrase corresponding to Filioque (καὶ τοῦ Υἱοῦ) to the Greek text of the Creed, where it would be associated with the verb ...
Nicene Creed - English Translations
... For English translations of the Nicene Creed, which of necessity are not as ancient as the above-mentioned versions, see English versions of the Nicene Creed in current use ...
List Of Patriarchs Of Antioch - Patriarchs of Antioch
... However, the adherents of the Nicene creed considered him the rightful bishop until his death ... It moved towards an acceptance of the Nicene creed and participated in the Council of Constantinople, but was not recognized by Alexandria or Rome Meletius (362–381), who ... group The followers of Eustathius, strictly adhering to the Nicene creed, elected the following bishops, who were recognized by bishops of Alexandria and Rome Paulinus (362–38 ...
Comparison Of Nicene Creeds Of 325 And 381 - History - The Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381
... Catholicism) hence the name "Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed", referring to the Creed as modified in the First Council of Constantinople ... Eastern Catholic Churches use exactly the same form of the Creed, since the Catholic Church teaches that it is wrong to add "and the Son" to the Greek verb ... cast on this explanation of the origin of the familiar Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed, commonly called the Nicene Creed ...
Comparison Of Nicene Creeds Of 325 And 381
... The Nicene Creed (Latin Symbolum Nicaenum) is the creed or profession of faith (Greek Σύμβολον τῆς Πίστεως) that is most widely used in Christian liturgy ... It is called Nicene ( /ˈnaɪsiːn/) because, in its original form, it was adopted in the city of Nicaea (İznik in what is now Turkey) by the first ecumenical council, which ... The Nicene Creed has been normative for the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Church of the East, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Anglican Communion, and many Protestant ...

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