New York Public Library For The Performing Arts

New York Public Library For The Performing Arts

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza, Manhattan, New York City, houses one of the world's largest collections of materials relating to the performing arts. It is one of the four research centers of the New York Public Library's Research library system, and it is also one of the branch libraries. It is located in New York City at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts between the Metropolitan Opera House and the Vivian Beaumont Theater.

Read more about New York Public Library For The Performing ArtsResearch Collections, Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound, Theatre On Film and Tape Archive (TOFT), Branch (Circulating) Collections, Shelby Collum Davis Museum, Public Programs, References

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New York Public Library For The Performing Arts - References
... Sydney Beck, "Carleton Sprague Smith and the Shaping of a Great Music Library Harbinger of a Center for the Performing Arts (Recollections of a Staff ... Guide to the Research Collections of the New York Public Library ... New York New York Public Library, 1975 ...

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