New World Vulture

The New World vulture or condor family Cathartidae contains seven species in five genera, all but one of which are monotypic. It includes five vultures and two condors found in warm and temperate areas of the Americas.

New World vultures are not closely genetically related to the superficially similar family of Old World vultures; similarities between the two groups are due to convergent evolution. Just how closely related they are is a matter of debate (see Taxonomy and nomenclature). The "New World" vultures were widespread in both the Old World and North America during the Neogene.

Vultures are scavenging birds, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals. New World vultures have a good sense of smell, but Old World vultures find carcasses exclusively by sight. A particular characteristic of many vultures is a bald head, devoid of feathers.

Read more about New World Vulture:  Taxonomy and Nomenclature, Description, Distribution and Habitat, Status and Conservation, In Culture

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Famous quotes containing the words vulture and/or world:

    It disturbs me no more to find men base, unjust, or selfish than to see apes mischievous, wolves savage, or the vulture ravenous for its prey.
    Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622–1673)

    This land is your land & this land is my land—sure—but the world is run by those that never listen to music anyway.
    Bob Dylan [Robert Allen Zimmerman] (b. 1941)