Neiman Marcus Fashion Award

The Neiman Marcus Award for Distinguished Service in the Field of Fashion was a yearly award created in 1938 by Carrie Marcus Neiman and Stanley Marcus. Unlike the Coty Award, it was not limited to American-based fashion designers. Recipients of the Neiman Marcus Awards include couturiers, non-American based designers, journalists, manufacturers, and celebrities and style icons who had had a significant personal influence upon fashion such as Grace Kelly and Grace Mirabella. The award was typically presented to multiple recipients each year, rather than to a single individual, although Adrian was the sole winner in 1943, a feat repeated in 1957 by Coco Chanel. From 1969 the awards became increasingly intermittent, with ceremonies held in 1973, 1979, 1980, 1984 and 1995, the last year in which the awards were presented. For the final ceremony, the founder, Stanley Marcus, received one of his own awards.

Other articles related to "neiman marcus fashion award, marcus":

Neiman Marcus Fashion Award - Award Winners - 1970-1995
1980 Judith Leiber Karl Lagerfeld 1984 Issey Miyake Jack Lenor Larsen 1995 Stanley Marcus Miuccia Prada Jean-Paul Goude Grace Mirabella ...

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