Nebraska Cornhuskers - Winter Varsity Sports - Men's Indoor Track and Field

Men's Indoor Track and Field

The indoor Nebraska track and field team started in 1922 under coach Henry Schulte who led the Huskers to nine conference titles before his retirement. His assistant Ed Weir replaced Schulte and won five addition indoor conference titles before moving on to be the assistant athletic director. Jerry Lee would lead the team for a single season in 1955 before Frank Sevigne took over the program. Under Sevigne, the Huskers won 11 individual national championships, with 42 all-American athletes and 103 individual conference champions in combined indoor and outdoor track and field. After his retirement in 1983, current coach Gary Pepin took over the program and coaches both the men’s and women’s teams.

Nebraska Cornhuskers men's track and field

StadiumBob Devaney Sports Center

Culture – Dear Old Nebraska U • Hail Varsity • University of Nebraska Cornhusker Marching Band • Herbie Husker • Lil' Red

Missouri Valley Conference Championships

1925 • 1926

Big 6 Conference Championships

1930 • 1931 • 1932 • 1933 • 1936 • 1937 • 1938 • 1940 • 1941 • 1942

Big 7 Conference Championships

1949 • 1951

Big 8 Conference Championships

1963 • 1972 • 1973 • 1978 • 1985 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 • 1992 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996

Big 12 Conference Championships

1997 • 1998 • 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2007 • 2009 • 2010

Head Coach

1898 J.E. Pearson • 1899 Clinton Barr • 1900 T.J. Hewitt • 1901 W. Engel • 1902 S.D. Clinton • 1903-1909 Dr. R.G. Clapp • 1910-1911 Osmond F. Field • 1912-1916 Guy Reed • 1917-1918 E.J. Stewart • 1919-1938 Henry Schulte • 1939-1954 Ed Weir • 1955 Jerry Lee • 1956-1983 Frank Sevigne • 1984-Present Gary Pepin

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    The snow had begun in the gloaming,
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    James Russell Lowell (1819–1891)

    Commit a crime and the world is made of glass. Commit a crime, and it seems as if a coat of snow fell on the ground, such as reveals in the woods the track of every partridge and fox and squirrel and mole.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    I heartily accept the motto, “That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,—”That government is best which governs not at all”; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    As a man grows older, his ability to sit still and follow indoor occupations increases. He grows vespertinal in his habits as the evening of life approaches, till at last he comes forth only just before sundown, and gets all the walk that he requires in half an hour.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)