Navy Electronics Laboratory

Navy Electronics Laboratory

The U.S. Navy Electronics Laboratory (NEL) was created in 1945, with consolidation of the naval radio station, radar operators training school, and radio security activity of the Navy Radio and Sound Lab and its wartime partner, the University of California Division of War Research. NEL’s charter was “to effectuate the solution of any problem in the field of electronics, in connection with the design, procurement, testing, installation and maintenance of electronic equipment for the U.S. Navy.” Its radio communications and sonar work was augmented with basic research in the propagation of electromagnetic energy in the atmosphere and of sound in the ocean.

Read more about Navy Electronics Laboratory:  History, Naval Command, Control and Communications Laboratory Center and Beyond

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Navy Electronics Laboratory - Naval Command, Control and Communications Laboratory Center and Beyond
... In 1967, as part of the general Navy laboratory re-organization, NEL became the Naval Command, Control and Communications Laboratory Center ... and in about six months it was changed to Naval Electronics Laboratory Center (NELC) ...

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