Native American Children

Some articles on native american children, american, children, native:

Native American Boarding Schools
... during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to educate Native American children and youths according to Euro-American standards ... started schools on reservations and founded boarding schools to provide opportunities for children who did not have schools nearby, especially in the ... The government paid religious societies to provide education to Native American children on reservations ...
Forced Conversion - Christianity - Native American Boarding Schools
... The government paid religious societies to provide education to Native American children on reservations ... Children were usually immersed in European-American culture through appearance changes with haircuts, were forbidden to speak their native languages, and traditional names were replaced by new European-American ... The experience of the schools was often harsh, especially for the younger children who were separated from their families ...
The American Prisoner
... The American Prisoner is a novel written by Eden Phillpotts, published in America in 1904 and adapted into a film in 1929 ... The story concerns an English woman who lives at Fox Tor farm, and an American captured during the American Revolutionary War and held at the prison at Princetown on Dartmoor ...

Famous quotes containing the words native american, children, native and/or american:

    It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    Most of us have felt barriers between ourselves and our fathers and had thought that going it alone was part of what it meant to be a man. We tried to get close to our children when we became fathers, and yet the business of practicing masculinity kept getting in the way. We men have begun to talk about that.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)

    To tell the truth, I saw an advertisement for able-bodied seamen, when I was a boy, sauntering in my native port, and as soon as I came of age I embarked.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    An ... important antidote to American democracy is American gerontocracy. The positions of eminence and authority in Congress are allotted in accordance with length of service, regardless of quality. Superficial observers have long criticized the United States for making a fetish of youth. This is unfair. Uniquely among modern organs of public and private administration, its national legislature rewards senility.
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908)