National Register of Historic Places Listings At Colleges and Universities in The United States

This is an incomplete list of historic properties and districts at United States colleges and universities that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). This includes National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) and other National Register of Historic Places listings. It includes listings at current and former educational institutions.

The main list is organized by institution name. A second list of NHLs at colleges and universities is organized by state.

Of the colleges and universities listed here, the University of California, Berkeley, has the most NRHP listings, with 22, including one NHL. Tied for second are Harvard University with 17 NRHP listing including two historic districts and five NHLs, and the University of Florida which has 17, including one historic district with 14 contributing properties. The University of Wisconsin–Madison has the third most identified sites, with 16, of which four are NHLs.

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