Narseh

Narseh (Persian: نرسی‎), (whose name is also sometimes written as Narses or Narseus) was the seventh Sassanid King of Persia (293–302), and son of Shapur I (241–272).

During the rule of his father Shapur I, Narseh had served as the Viceroy of Sistan, Baluchistan and Sindh. Prior to becoming King of Persia, he held the title Great King of Armenia.

Narseh overthrew the increasingly unpopular Bahram III in 293 with the support of most of the nobility. The circumstances of Narseh's rise to power are detailed in the Paikuli inscription.

Read more about NarsehRelations With Rome, Abdication

Other articles related to "narseh":

Galerius - War With Persia - Peace Negotiations
... Narseh had previously sent an ambassador to Galerius to plead for the return of his wife and children, but Galerius had dismissed this ambassador, reminding him of how Shapur had treated Valerian ... The Romans, in any case, treated Narseh's captured family with tact, perhaps seeking to evoke comparisons to Alexander and his beneficent conduct ... Their magister memoriae (secretary) Sicorius Probus was sent to Narseh to present terms ...
Galerius - War With Persia - Invasion, Counterinvasion
... In 294, Narseh, a son of Shapur I who had been passed over for the Sassanid succession, came into power in Persia ... Narseh probably moved to eliminate Bahram III, a young man installed by a noble named Vahunam in the wake of Bahram II's death in 293 ... In early 294, Narseh sent Diocletian the customary package of gifts, but within Persia he was destroying every trace of his immediate predecessors, erasing their names from public monuments ...
Arsacid Dynasty Of Armenia - Sassanids and Armenia
... in 270, Hurmazd took the Persian throne and his brother Narseh ruled Armenia in his name ... The Sassanids stirred some nobles to revolt when Narseh left to take the Persian throne in 293 ... Rome nevertheless defeated Narseh in 298, and Khosrov II's son Tiridates III regained control over Armenia with the support of Roman soldiers ...
Narseh - Abdication
... It is not known for how long Narses survived his abdication ... However, it is well known that Narses was already dead by the time of Hormizd's death in 309 for the throne passed onto Hormizd's still-unborn son Shapur ...
History Of Kurdistan - Muslim Conquests
... A Kurd named Nasr or Narseh converted to Christianity, and changed his name to Theophobos during the reign of Emperor Theophilus and was the emperor's intimate friend and commander for many ... Narseh joined Babak's rebellion in southern Kurdistan, but Abbasid armies defeated his forces in 833 and according to the Muslim historian Tabari around 60,000 of his followers were killed ... Narseh himself fled to the Byzantine territories and helped form the Kurdish contingent of Theophilus ...