Names of God - Literature and Fiction

Literature and Fiction

  • Names of God in Old English poetry
  • Aigonz is the word for God in the lingua ignota of Hildegard of Bingen.
  • Eru Ilúvatar (also Ëu), a name of the one, God in Quenya, a fictional language invented by J. R. R. Tolkien, a professor of linguistics. It means "The One, All-father". Notably, the creation of the universe is named Eä, (all that) Is, from the proclamation "Therefore I say: Eä! Let these things Be!", a probable reference to Ehyeh by the devoutly Catholic Tolkien.
  • "The Nine Billion Names of God", a short story by Arthur C. Clarke.
  • Maleldil is the name of God (or, more accurately, of the allegorical character associated with Jesus) in Old Solar, the true language in the Space Trilogy books by C. S. Lewis. In The Chronicles of Narnia series, Aslan is similarly associated with Jesus as a lion in a fictional other world.
  • In the movie Pi, the characters are looking for the true name of god, which is 216 letters long.
  • In the movie Warlock the main character seeks out the pages of the Grand Grimoire which can be commanded to reveal the true lost name of God. If it can be spoken backwards, the universe will end. Viewers are shown the letters forming, but not the actual word, and the Warlock does not get beyond pronouncing the first (last) syllable before he is killed.
  • In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Indiana nearly gets killed trying to spell the name of God (Jehovah) in an ancient word puzzle. He had stepped on "J" and nearly fell to his death, then remembered that in Latin Jehovah begins with an "I".

Read more about this topic:  Names Of God

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