Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. It is marketed in generic form as its hydrochloride salt, naltrexone hydrochloride, and marketed under the trade names Revia and Depade. In some countries including the United States, a once-monthly extended-release injectable formulation is marketed under the trade name Vivitrol. Also in the US, Methylnaltrexone Bromide, a closely related drug, is marketed as Relistor, for the treatment of opioid induced constipation.

Naltrexone should not be confused with naloxone (which is used in emergency cases of overdose rather than for longer-term dependence control) nor nalorphine. Using naloxone in place of naltrexone can cause far worse withdrawal symptoms; conversely, using naltrexone in place of naloxone in an overdose can lead to insufficient opiate antagonism and fail to reverse the overdose.

Read more about NaltrexoneAdverse Effects, Contraindications, Mechanism of Action, Structure and Pharmacokinetics

Other articles related to "naltrexone":

Naltrexone - Structure and Pharmacokinetics
... Naltrexone can be described as a substituted oxymorphone – here the tertiary amine methyl-substituent is replaced with methylcyclopropane ... Naltrexone is the N-cyclopropylmethyl derivative of oxymorphone ... Naltrexone is metabolised mainly to 6β-naltrexol by the liver enzyme dihydrodiol dehydrogenase ...
Opioid Antagonist - Depersonalization Disorder
... Naloxone and naltrexone have both been studied for the treatment of depersonalization disorder ... The findings of a 2005 naltrexone study were slightly less promising, with an average of a 30% reduction of symptoms, as measured by 3 validated dissociation scales ... The more dramatic result of naloxone versus naltrexone is suspected to be due to different endogenous opioid receptor selectivity in naloxone, which is better suited to ...
Low-dose Naltrexone - Background
... Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist, meaning it binds to opioid receptors in cells ... Naltrexone also works to bind against the effects of heroin, which is synthesized from morphine, and is useful to alleviate opioid dependence ... Food and Drug Administration have approved the use of naltrexone for chronic treatment of opioid dependence and for drug detoxification ...
Sinclair Method - Obstacles
... Naltrexone was approved by the FDA in 1984 ... In 1994, the FDA approved use of naltrexone in conjunction with drinking to extinguish alcohol dependence ... Journal of the American Medical Association in May, 2006, has shown "that while naltrexone was effective in its own right, combining it with the specialized counseling added no more effectiveness than naltrexone by ...
Sinclair Method - Evidence of Efficacy
2001 in a study entitled "Targeted Use of Naltrexone Without Prior Detoxification in the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence A Factorial Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial" ... The first received naltrexone and was given counseling to encourage moderate drinking ... The third received naltrexone and was given counseling to support abstinence ...