Municipal Annexation in The United States

Municipal Annexation In The United States

Municipal annexation is a process by which a municipality expands its boundaries into adjacent areas not already incorporated into the municipality. This has been a common response of cities to urbanization in neighboring areas. It may be done because the neighboring urban areas seek municipal services or because a city seeks control over its suburbs or neighboring unincorporated areas.

In the United States, all local governments are considered "creatures of the state" according to Dillon's Rule, which resulted from the work of John Forrest Dillon on the law of municipal corporations. Dillon's Rule implies, among other things, that the boundaries of any jurisdiction falling under state government can be modified by state government action. For this reason, examples of municipal annexation are distinct from annexations involving sovereign states.

Read more about Municipal Annexation In The United States:  Shoestring Annexation

Other articles related to "municipal annexation in the united states, annexation":

Municipal Annexation In The United States - Shoestring Annexation - Allston-Brighton
... As a result, a shoestring annexation was obtained by Boston from Brookline when Brighton joined Boston ... by Brookline's refusal to join Boston a year before Brighton's annexation ...

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