Mount Gerizim

Mount Gerizim ( /ˈɡɛrɨˌzɪm/; Samaritan Hebrew Ar-garízim, Arabic جبل جرزيم Jabal Jarizīm, Tiberian Hebrew הַר גְּרִזִּים Har Gərizzîm, Standard Hebrew הַר גְּרִיזִּים Har Gərizzim) is one of the two mountains in the immediate vicinity of the West Bank city of Nablus (biblical Shechem), and forms the southern side of the valley in which Nablus is situated, the northern side being formed by Mount Ebal. The mountain is one of the highest peaks in the West Bank and rises to 2849 feet (881 m) above sea level, 228 feet (69.5 m) shorter than Mount Ebal. The mountain is particularly steep on the northern side, is sparsely covered at the top with shrubbery, and lower down there is a spring with a high yield of fresh water.

A Samaritan village (Kiryat Luza) and an Israeli settlement (Har Bracha) are situated on the mountain ridge.

The mountain is sacred to the Samaritans who regard it, rather than Jerusalem's Temple Mount, as having been the location chosen by Yahweh for a holy temple. The mountain continues to be the centre of Samaritan religion to this day, and over 90% of the worldwide population of Samaritans live in very close proximity to Gerizim, mostly in Kiryat Luza, the main village. The passover is celebrated by the Samaritans on Mount Gerizim, and it is additionally considered by them as the location of the near-sacrifice of Isaac (the masoretic, Septuagint and the Dead Sea Scroll versions of Genesis state that this happened on Mount Moriah which Jews traditionally identify as the Temple Mount). According to classical rabbinical sources, in order to convert to Judaism, a Samaritan must first and foremost renounce any belief in the sanctity of Mount Gerizim.

Read more about Mount Gerizim:  Biblical Account, Post-exile History, Archaeology

Other articles related to "mount gerizim, mount":

Mount Gerizim - Archaeology
... As a result of the fortified church and previous Samaritan temple, extensive ruins still exist at the somewhat plateau-like top of Gerizim ... The line of the wall around the church can easily be seen, as can portions of the former castle, and initial archaeological study of the site postulated that the castle built by Justinian had utilised stones from an earlier structure on the site (probably the Samaritan temple) ...
Christianity In Israel - Sanctity of Jerusalem, Mount Gerizim, and Haifa/Acre
... Mount Gerizim is a holy site to what can be considered a fifth - Samaritanism ... coexistence, some sites, such as the Temple Mount, have been a continuous source of friction and controversy ... site for Jews, second only to the Temple Mount itself ...
Sanballat The Horonite
... perhaps to be identified with the village of Hawara at the foot of Mount Gerizim ... of Baal were idolatrous, and he chose from tradition Mount Gerizim, over whose site he chose a high priest from a noble family in Jerusalem, a grandson of Eliashib, to preside, and to ... He established a temple to YHWH on Mount Gerizim, over which his own descendents, as born into priestly blood, could minister ...
Samaritans - Modern Times
... Samaritans, half of whom reside in their modern homes at Kiryat Luza on Mount Gerizim, which is sacred to them, and the rest in the city of Holon, just outside Tel Aviv ... Until the 1980s, most of the Samaritans resided in the Samarian town of Nablus below Mount Gerizim ... Priest, who is selected by age from the priestly family, and resides on Mount Gerizim ...
Conquests of John Hyrcanus
... After these victories, Hyrcanus went north towards Schechem and Mount Gerizim ... The city of Schechem was reduced to a village and the Samaritan Temple on Mount Gerizim was destroyed ... Destroying the Samaritan Temple on Mount Gerizim helped ameliorate Hyrcanus’ status among religious elite and common Jews who detested any Jewish ...

Famous quotes containing the word mount:

    On the 31st of August, 1846, I left Concord in Massachusetts for Bangor and the backwoods of Maine,... I proposed to make excursions to Mount Ktaadn, the second highest mountain in New England, about thirty miles distant, and to some of the lakes of the Penobscot, either alone or with such company as I might pick up there.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)