Moore Neighborhood

In cellular automata, the Moore neighborhood comprises the eight cells surrounding a central cell on a two-dimensional square lattice. The neighborhood is named after Edward F. Moore, a pioneer of cellular automata theory. It is one of the two most commonly used neighborhood types, the other one being the 4-cell von Neumann neighborhood. The well known Conway's Game of Life, for example, uses the Moore neighborhood. It is similar to the notion of 8-connected pixels in computer graphics.

The concept can be extended to higher dimensions, for example forming a 26-cell cubic neighborhood for a cellular automaton in three dimensions.

The Moore neighbourhood of a point is the points at a Chebyshev distance of 1.

The number of cells in a Moore neighbourhood, given its range r, is the odd squares: (2r + 1)2.

Read more about Moore Neighborhood:  Algorithm, Termination Condition, Applications

Other articles related to "neighborhood, neighborhoods, moore neighborhood":

Cellular Automata In Popular Culture - Overview
... The neighborhood of a cell is the nearby, usually adjacent, cells ... The two most common types of neighborhoods are the von Neumann neighborhood and the Moore neighborhood ... The latter includes the von Neumann neighborhood as well as the four remaining cells surrounding the cell whose state is to be calculated ...
Cellular Image Processing - Overview
... The neighborhood of a cell is the nearby, usually adjacent, cells ... The two most common types of neighborhoods are the von Neumann neighborhood and the Moore neighborhood ... The latter includes the von Neumann neighborhood as well as the four remaining cells surrounding the cell whose state is to be calculated ...

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