Mood Management Theory

Mood management theory posits that the consumption of messages, particularly entertaining messages, is capable of altering prevailing mood states, and that the selection of specific messages for consumption often serves the regulation of mood states (Zillmann, 1988a).

Read more about Mood Management Theory:  History, Fundamental Assumptions, Empirical Evidence, Challenges

Other articles related to "moods, mood management theory, management":

Asperger Syndrome - Management - Medications
... Individuals with AS may be unable to identify and communicate their internal moods and emotions or to tolerate side effects that for most people would not be problematic ...
Mood Management Theory - Challenges
... The theoretical proposition of mood management theory has been faced with challenges, especially when studying (1) the role that negative moods and burdening feelings play ...
Xplor International - Associations in Related Fields
... Association for Information and Image Management, the association for electronic content management Association of Records Managers and Administrators, the association for records management ...
Yale School Of Management
... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, United ... The School awards the Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Advanced Management (MAM), and Ph.D ... conducts education and research in leadership, economics, operations management, marketing, entrepreneurship, organizational behavior, and other areas as of this time ...

Famous quotes containing the words theory, mood and/or management:

    The weakness of the man who, when his theory works out into a flagrant contradiction of the facts, concludes “So much the worse for the facts: let them be altered,” instead of “So much the worse for my theory.”
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    Funny, but when you’re near me I’m in the mood for love.
    Dorothy Fields (1904–1974)

    No officer should be required or permitted to take part in the management of political organizations, caucuses, conventions, or election campaigns. Their right to vote and to express their views on public questions, either orally or through the press, is not denied, provided it does not interfere with the discharge of their official duties. No assessment for political purposes on officers or subordinates should be allowed.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)