Molecular Cloning

Molecular cloning is a set of experimental methods in molecular biology that are used to assemble recombinant DNA molecules and to direct their replication within host organisms. The use of the word cloning refers to the fact that the method involves the replication of a single DNA molecule starting from a single living cell to generate a large population of cells containing identical DNA molecules. Molecular cloning generally uses DNA sequences from two different organisms: the species that is the source of the DNA to be cloned, and the species that will serve as the living host for replication of the recombinant DNA. Molecular cloning methods are central to many contemporary areas of modern biology and medicine.

In a conventional molecular cloning experiment, the DNA to be cloned is obtained from an organism of interest, then treated with enzymes in the test tube to generate smaller DNA fragments. Subsequently, these fragments are then combined with vector DNA to generate recombinant DNA molecules. The recombinant DNA is then introduced into a host organism (typically an easy-to-grow, benign, laboratory strain of E. coli bacteria). This will generate a population of organisms in which recombinant DNA molecules are replicated along with the host DNA. Because they contain foreign DNA fragments, these are transgenic or genetically-modified microorganisms (GMO). This process takes advantage of the fact that a single bacterial cell can be induced to take up and replicate a single recombinant DNA molecule. This single cell can then be expanded exponentially to generate a large amount of bacteria, each of which contain copies of the original recombinant molecule. Thus, both the resulting bacterial population, and the recombinant DNA molecule, are commonly referred to as "clones". Strictly speaking, recombinant DNA refers to DNA molecules, while molecular cloning refers to the experimental methods used to assemble them.

Read more about Molecular Cloning:  History of Molecular Cloning, Overview, Steps in Molecular Cloning, Applications of Molecular Cloning, Production of Recombinant Proteins

Other articles related to "molecular cloning, molecular, cloning":

Clone (genetics) - Overview
... Molecular cloning takes advantage of the fact that the chemical structure of DNA is fundamentally the same in all living organisms ... is inserted into a DNA segment containing the molecular sequences required for DNA replication, and the resulting recombinant DNA is introduced into the organism from which the replication sequences ... Molecular cloning is similar to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that it permits the replication of a specific DNA sequence ...
Molecular Cloning - Production of Recombinant Proteins - Gene Therapy
... Despite a great deal of publicity and promises, the history of human gene therapy has been characterized by relatively limited success ... The effect of introducing a gene into cells often promotes only partial and/or transient relief from the symptoms of the disease being treated ...
Clone (genetics) - Steps in Molecular Cloning - Choice of Host Organism and Cloning Vector
... Although a very large number of host organisms and molecular cloning vectors are in use, the great majority of molecular cloning experiments begin with a laboratory strain of the bacterium E ... coli (Escherichia coli) and a plasmid cloning vector ... In practice, however, specialized molecular cloning experiments usually begin with cloning into a bacterial plasmid, followed by subcloning into a ...
Molecular Cloning
... Molecular cloning refers to the process of making multiple molecules ... Cloning is commonly used to amplify DNA fragments containing whole genes, but it can also be used to amplify any DNA sequence such as promoters, non-coding sequences and randomly fragmented DNA ... Occasionally, the term cloning is misleadingly used to refer to the identification of the chromosomal location of a gene associated with a particular phenotype of interest ...

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