Modified Harvard Architecture

The Modified Harvard architecture is a variation of the Harvard computer architecture that allows the contents of the instruction memory to be accessed as if it were data. Most modern computers that are documented as Harvard architecture are, in fact, Modified Harvard architecture.

Read more about Modified Harvard ArchitectureHarvard Architecture, Modified Harvard Architecture, Comparisons, Modern Uses of The Modified Harvard Architecture

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Modern Uses of The Modified Harvard Architecture
... There are also processors which are Harvard machines by the most rigorous definition (that program and data memory occupy different address spaces), and are only ...

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