Modernity

Modernity typically refers to an historical era, roughly defined as a post-traditional or post-medieval period beginning Renaissance (ca. 14th–17th Centuries), characterized by a move from feudalism (or agrarianism) toward capitalism, industrialization, secularization, rationalization, the nation-state and its constituent institutions and forms of surveillance (Barker 2005, 444)

Conceptually, modernity relates to the modern era and to modernism, but forms a distinct concept. Whereas the Enlightenment (ca. 1650–1800) invokes a specific movement in Western philosophy, modernity tends to refer only to the social relations associated with the rise of capitalism. Modernity may also refer to tendencies in intellectual culture, particularly the movements intertwined with secularisation and post-industrial life, such as Marxism, existentialism, and the formal establishment of social science. In context, modernity has been associated with cultural and intellectual movements of 1436–1789 and extending to the 1970s or later (Toulmin 1992, 3–5).

Read more about ModernityRelated Terms, Phases of Modernity, Modernity Defined

Other articles related to "modernity":

Modern Life? - Modernity Defined
... available conceptual definitions in sociology, modernity is "marked and defined by an obsession with 'evidence'," visual culture, and personal visibility (Leppert 2004, 19) ... large-scale social integration constituting modernity, involves the increased movement of goods, capital, people, and information among formerly discrete populations, and consequent influence beyond the local ...
Modernity Defined
... Of the available conceptual definitions in sociology, modernity is "marked and defined by an obsession with 'evidence'," visual culture, and personal ... Generally, the large-scale social integration constituting modernity, involves the increased movement of goods, capital, people, and information ...
Modern Life?
... Modernity typically refers to a post-traditional, post-medieval historical period, one marked by the move from feudalism (or agrarianism) toward capitalism, industrialization ... Charles Pierre Baudelaire is credited with coining the term "modernity" (modernité) to designate the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban ... Conceptually, modernity relates to the modern era and to modernism, but forms a distinct concept ...
Modern Life? - See Also
... society Postmodernity Hypermodernity Transmodernity Late modernity Second modernity Islam and modernity Modern Orthodox Judaism Modernism (Roman Catholicism) Buddhist modernism ...
Modern Life? - Defining Modernity - Artistically
... Modern art therefore belongs only to the later phases of modernity. 2,4) For this reason art history keeps the term "modernity" distinct from the terms Modern Age and Modernism – as a discrete "term applied to the cultural condition in which the seemingly ... And modernity in art "is more than merely the state of being modern, or the opposition between old and new" (Smith 2009) ...

Famous quotes containing the word modernity:

    The critical method which denies literary modernity would appear—and even, in certain respects, would be—the most modern of critical movements.
    Paul Deman (1919–1983)