Missabe and Iron Range Railway

Some articles on iron, missabe and iron range railway, missabe, range railway, railway:

Iron - Precautions
... NFPA 1 ... Fire diamond for powdered iron metal Large amounts of ingested iron can cause excessive levels of iron in the blood ... High blood levels of free ferrous iron react with peroxides to produce free radicals, which are highly reactive and can damage DNA, proteins, lipids, and other cellular components ... Thus, iron toxicity occurs when there is free iron in the cell, which generally occurs when iron levels exceed the capacity of transferrin to bind the iron ...
Duluth, Missabe And Iron Range Railway - Merger With Wisconsin Central
... In December 2011, the Duluth, Missabe Iron Range Railway was merged into Wisconsin Central Ltd ... which is also controlled by Canadian National Railway ...

Famous quotes containing the words railway, range and/or iron:

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    The Canadians of those days, at least, possessed a roving spirit of adventure which carried them further, in exposure to hardship and danger, than ever the New England colonist went, and led them, though not to clear and colonize the wilderness, yet to range over it as coureurs de bois, or runners of the woods, or, as Hontan prefers to call them, coureurs de risques, runners of risks; to say nothing of their enterprising priesthood.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    By the flow of the inland river,
    Whence the fleets of iron have fled,
    Where the blades of the grave-grass quiver,
    Asleep are the ranks of the dead:—
    Francis Miles Finch (1827–1907)