Military of Azerbaijan - Navy

class="left_top_holder">

Navy

The main naval base of the Soviet Union in the Caspian Sea was based in Baku. When the Soviet Union collapsed, Azerbaijan inherited the naval base and parts of the Caspian Fleet. The Azerbaijan Navy has about 2,200 personnel. The navy has a Petya class light frigate, Qusar (G 121), and a number of patrol craft, including one Turk class, Araz, P 223, one Brya (Project 722) class, P 218, one Shelon (Project 1388M) class, P 212, one Poluchat class (Project 368), P 219, one Luga class (Project 888), T 710, and four Petrushka (Polish UK-3 class), P 213, P 214, P 215, and P 216. There are four minesweepers consisting of 2 Sonya class minesweeper and 2 Yevgenya class minesweepers. (Jane's Fighting Ships 2010)

The Navy is also attributed with 5 landing craft, 3 Polnochny and 2 Vydra,(IISS 2007) plus three research ships, 1 Project 10470, A 671, ex Svyaga, 1 Balerian Uryvayev class survey vessel (AG) and one Vadim Popov class survey vessel (AG).

The U.S. Navy has helped train the Azeri Navy. There is also an agreement to provide US support to refurbish Azeri warships in the Caspian Sea. In 2006, the US Government donated 3 motorboats to the Azerbaijani navy. In 2007 an agreement between Azeri Navy and a US military company was concluded, which stated that a part of the Azeri Navy would be equipped with advanced laser marksmanship systems. The US company specialists were also to give training on the use of the new equipment. A number of separate U.S. programmes are underway under the Caspian Guard Initiative, focused mostly on enhancing Azerbaijani and Kazakh maritime border security.

In May 2011, President of the State Oil Company of Azerbaijan Republic Rovnag Abdullayev stated that Azerbaijan to start production of national warships after 2013.

Read more about this topic:  Military Of Azerbaijan

Other articles related to "navy":

USS Enterprise (CV-6)
... colloquially referred to as the "Big E," was the sixth aircraft carrier of the United States Navy and the seventh U.S ... Navy ship to bear the name ... Some have labeled her the most glorious and honored ship in the history of the United States Navy, rivaled only perhaps by the 18th century frigate USS Constitution ...
Navy - Additional Reading
... Influence of History on Sea Power The Royal Navy and the Lessons of 1914-1918," Pacific Historical Review ... (2012) United We Are Strong An Investigation into Sense of Community among Navy Crews, Armed Forces Society, Vol ...
USS Brooklyn (1858) - Final Decommissioning and Sale
... She was decommissioned at the New York Navy Yard on 14 May 1889, and her name was struck from the Navy List on 6 January 1890 ... She was sold by public auction at the Norfolk Navy Yard on 25 March 1891 to E ...
Mount Baker - U.S. Navy
... Two ammunition ships of the United States Navy (traditionally named for volcanoes) have been named after the mountain ... In 1972, the Navy commissioned USS Mount Baker (AE-34) ...
Glaucus (disambiguation) - Navy
... USS Glaucus (1863), a steamship of the Union Navy during the American Civil War SS Glaucus (1871), a sister ship of SS Antenor (1872) Greek submarine Glafkos (Υ-6), a Protefs class submarine of the Hellenic Navy ...

Famous quotes containing the word navy:

    I call to mind the navy great
    That the Greeks brought to Troye town,
    And how the boistous winds did beat
    Their ships, and rent their sails adown;
    Till Agamemnon’s daughter’s blood
    Appeased the gods that them withstood.
    Henry Howard, Earl Of Surrey (1517?–1547)

    The Navy is the asylum for the perverse, the home of the unfortunate. Here the sons of adversity meet the children of calamity, and here the children of calamity meet the offspring of sin.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    I wish to reiterate all the reasons which [my predecessor] has presented in favor of the policy of maintaining a strong navy as the best conservator of our peace with other nations and the best means of securing respect for the assertion of our rights of the defense of our interests, and the exercise of our influence in international matters.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)