Mildred Burke - Early Life

Early Life

Mildred Burke, aged 15, began to work as a waitress on the Zuni Indian Reservation in Gallup, New Mexico. She lived there for three years, before leaving for Kansas City after agreeing to marry her boyfriend. He took her to a wrestling event, which sparked her interest in the sport. Burke, who was pregnant at the time, later persevered.

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