Microsoft Visual Programming Language

Microsoft Visual Programming Language

Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio (Microsoft RDS, MRDS) is a Windows-based environment for robot control and simulation. It is aimed at academic, hobbyist, and commercial developers and handles a wide variety of robot hardware. It requires the Microsoft Windows 7 operating system.

RDS is based on CCR (Concurrency and Coordination Runtime): a .NET-based concurrent library implementation for managing asynchronous parallel tasks. This technique involves using message-passing and a lightweight services-oriented runtime, DSS (Decentralized Software Services), which allows the orchestration of multiple services to achieve complex behaviors.

Features include: a visual programming tool, Microsoft Visual Programming Language for creating and debugging robot applications, web-based and windows-based interfaces, 3D simulation (including hardware acceleration), easy access to a robot's sensors and actuators. The primary programming language is C#.

Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio includes support for packages to add other services to the suite. Those currently available include Soccer Simulation and Sumo Competition by Microsoft, and a community-developed Maze Simulator, a program to create worlds with walls that can be explored by a virtual robot, and a set of services for OpenCV. Most of the additional packages are hosted on CodePlex (search for Robotics Studio). Course materials are also available.

Read more about Microsoft Visual Programming LanguageComponents, Tools, Notable Applications, Critique, Versions and Licensing, Supported Robots

Other articles related to "visual, microsoft visual programming language, microsoft":

Brodmann Area 19 - Function
... Area 19 is a histologically delineated band anterolaterally abutting visual area 18 ... this area may be a heterogeneous collection of visual areas, with multiple incomplete representations of the visual scene ... In humans, this band putatively contains regions of the visual areas designated V3, V4, V5 (also known as the middle temporal area, or MT) and V6 (also known as ...
Visual Guide
... block a website or similar work product, a Visual Guide can be an intermediate step toward the end goal of a complete website ... By creating a visual guide along the way, the designer or developer can get buy-in from the other people involved in the website such as the customer, their manager and other ... A visual guide could be a wireframe, creative composition or information architecture ...
Microsoft Visual Programming Language - Supported Robots
... ABB Group Robotics - ABB Connect for Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio Adept MobileRobots Pioneers (first robots to run under MRDS) Pioneer DX and Pioneer AT Official WebSite (Subsumed under ...
Lateral Geniculate Nucleus
... (LGN) is the primary relay center for visual information received from the retina of the eye ... axons through the optic radiation, a direct pathway to the primary visual cortex ... strong feedback connections from the primary visual cortex ...
Lateral Geniculate Nucleus - Ipsilateral and Contralateral Layers
... each LGN only receives information from one half of the visual field ... Therefore, the right hemisphere receives visual information from the left visual field, and the left hemisphere receives visual information from the right ... Within one LGN, the visual information is divided among the various layers as follows the eye on the same side (the ipsilateral eye) sends information to layers 2, 3 and 5 the eye ...

Famous quotes containing the words programming and/or visual:

    If there is a price to pay for the privilege of spending the early years of child rearing in the driver’s seat, it is our reluctance, our inability, to tolerate being demoted to the backseat. Spurred by our success in programming our children during the preschool years, we may find it difficult to forgo in later states the level of control that once afforded us so much satisfaction.
    Melinda M. Marshall (20th century)

    Unlike any other visual image, a photograph is not a rendering, an imitation or an interpretation of its subject, but actually a trace of it. No painting or drawing, however naturalist, belongs to its subject in the way that a photograph does.
    John Berger (b. 1926)