Mercenary War - in Literature and Popular Culture

In Literature and Popular Culture

Salammb├┤ is a novel by Gustave Flaubert set before and during the revolt. It portrays Mathos' obsessive desire for the fictional Carthaginian priestess Salammb├┤. A number of other works are based on Flaubert's novel.

Read more about this topic:  Mercenary War

Other articles related to "popular, in literature and popular culture":

Wadden Sea - Recreation
... Many of the islands have been popular seaside resorts since the 19th century ... walking on the sandy flats at low tide, has become popular in the Wadden Sea ... It is also a popular region for pleasure boating ...
Julia (given Name)
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Crystal Palace Dinosaurs - In Literature and Popular Culture
... The title story in Fanny and the Monsters, by Penelope Lively, is about a Victorian girl who visits the Crystal Palace dinosaurs and becomes fascinated by prehistoric creatures ... In Have His Carcase, by Dorothy Sayers, character Lord Peter Wimsey makes reference to the "antediluvian monsters" of the Crystal Palace. ...

Famous quotes containing the words popular culture, culture, literature and/or popular:

    Popular culture entered my life as Shirley Temple, who was exactly my age and wrote a letter in the newspapers telling how her mother fixed spinach for her, with lots of butter.... I was impressed by Shirley Temple as a little girl my age who had power: she could write a piece for the newspapers and have it printed in her own handwriting.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    What culture lacks is the taste for anonymous, innumerable germination. Culture is smitten with counting and measuring; it feels out of place and uncomfortable with the innumerable; its efforts tend, on the contrary, to limit the numbers in all domains; it tries to count on its fingers.
    Jean Dubuffet (1901–1985)

    Everything is becoming science fiction. From the margins of an almost invisible literature has sprung the intact reality of the 20th century.
    —J.G. (James Graham)

    What’s wrong, a little pavement sickness?
    —Russian saying popular in the Soviet period, trans. by Vladimir Ivanovich Shlyakov (1993)