Members of The 1931 Seanad - Composition of The 1931 Seanad

Composition of The 1931 Seanad

The Free State Seanad was elected in stages and thus considered to be in permanent session. However, as a gesture of continuity with its Free State predecessor, the first Seanad elected after 1937 is numbered as the "Second Seanad". The Free State Senate, despite the occurrence of five senatorial elections before its abolition, is considered to have been a single 'Seanad' for the duration of its existence and is thus referred for that whole period as the "First Seanad".

There were a total of 60 seats in the Free State Seanad. In 1931, 23 Senators were elected. The Seanad election in 1925 was a popular election. However, at the 1928 and subsequent Free State Seanad elections, the franchise was restricted to Oireachtas members.

17 Senators had been elected at the 1928 Seanad election and 19 Senators had been elected at the 1925 Seanad election. In 1922, 35 Senators had been elected by Dáil Éireann, and 25 had been nominated by the President of the Executive Council, W. T. Cosgrave.

The following table shows the composition by party when the 1931 Seanad first met on 6 December 1931.

Elected in 1922 Nominated in 1922 Elected in 1925 Elected in 1928 Elected in 1931 Total
12 years 12 years 9 years 12 years 6 years 9 years 3 years 6 years 9 years
Cumann na nGaedheal 0 0 2 4 0 1 1 0 2 10
Labour Party 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 6
Farmers' Party 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 5
Fianna Fáil 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 2 6
Independents 1 5 1 1 2 0 1 1 7 19
Total 1 7 3 14 6 5 2 1 20 60
  • Note: The figure above do not add up due to the Senators whose political affiliations are currently unknown.

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