Medical School - Medical Students - Burnout and Depression

Burnout and Depression

A US study estimated that approximately 50% of students experience burnout during medical school, as measured by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and feelings of professional inadequacy. Burnout in medical students, in addition, seems to be associated with increased likelihood of subsequent suicidal ideation.

It has been estimated by a US study that approximately 14% of medical students have symptoms of moderate to severe depression, and roughly 5% have suicidal thoughts at some point during training. In a South Korean study, 40% of medical students appeared to have depression. Medical students with more severe depression also may be less likely to seek treatment, largely from fear that faculty members would view them as being unable to handle their responsibilities. Students who feel that they lack a social support system are 10 times more likely to be depressed compared with students that consider themselves to have good social support.

Approximately 10% experience suicidal ideation during medical school.

Read more about this topic:  Medical School, Medical Students

Other articles related to "burnout and depression, burnout, depression":

Medical Education In South Africa - Medical Students - Burnout and Depression
... that approximately 50% of students experience burnout during medical school, as measured by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and feelings of professional inadequacy ... Burnout in medical students, in addition, seems to be associated with increased likelihood of subsequent suicidal ideation ... medical students have symptoms of moderate to severe depression, and roughly 5% have suicidal thoughts at some point during training ...

Famous quotes containing the word depression:

    I realized how for all of us who came of age in the late sixties and early seventies the war was a defining experience. You went or you didn’t, but the fact of it and the decisions it forced us to make marked us for the rest of our lives, just as the depression and World War II had marked my parents.
    Linda Grant (b. 1949)