Media Coverage of The Iraq War

Media Coverage Of The Iraq War

The 2003 invasion of Iraq involved unprecedented U.S. media coverage, particularly by FOX News. The coverage itself became a source of controversy, as media outlets were accused of bias, reporters were casualties of both Iraqi and American gunfire, and claims of censorship and propaganda became widespread.

Read more about Media Coverage Of The Iraq War:  U.S. Mainstream Media Coverage, U.S. Independent Media Coverage, Non-U.S. Media Coverage, Iraqi Media Coverage, "Embedded" Reporters, Firdos Square Controversy, Coverage of U.S. Casualties, Attack On Al Jazeera, Attack On Palestine Hotel, Journalist Casualties, Critical Journalists

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Famous quotes containing the words war and/or media:

    The trumpets sound, the banners fly,
    The glittering spears are ranked ready;
    The shouts o’ war are heard afar,
    The battle closes thick and bloody;
    But it’s no the roar o’ sea or shore
    Wad mak me langer wish to tarry;
    Nor shout o’ war that’s heard afar,
    Its leaving thee, my bonnie Mary.
    Robert Burns (1759–1796)

    One can describe a landscape in many different words and sentences, but one would not normally cut up a picture of a landscape and rearrange it in different patterns in order to describe it in different ways. Because a photograph is not composed of discrete units strung out in a linear row of meaningful pieces, we do not understand it by looking at one element after another in a set sequence. The photograph is understood in one act of seeing; it is perceived in a gestalt.
    Joshua Meyrowitz, U.S. educator, media critic. “The Blurring of Public and Private Behaviors,” No Sense of Place: The Impact of Electronic Media on Social Behavior, Oxford University Press (1985)