Mechanical Hackamore

A mechanical hackamore is a piece of horse tack that is a type of bitless headgear for horses where the reins connect to shanks placed between a noseband and a curb chain. Other names include "hackamore bit", "brockamore," "English hackamore," "nose bridle" and "German hackamore." Certain designs have been called "Blair's Pattern" and the "W. S. Bitless Pelham."

Read more about Mechanical Hackamore:  Design, History, Uses and Limitations

Other articles related to "mechanical hackamore, mechanical hackamores, hackamore":

Mechanical Hackamore - Uses and Limitations
... Mechanical hackamores often used in competitions where there are no specific bitting rules, such as rodeo and O-Mok-See events, and in the show jumping arena ... Mechanical hackamores lack the sophistication of bits or a bosal, cannot turn a horse easily with direct reining, and are primarily used for their considerable stopping power ... It is incorrect to assume that a mechanical hackamore is milder than a bitted bridle, it is not ...
Bitless Bridle - Styles - Hybrid Designs
... In a mechanical hackamore, also known as a hackamore bit, brockamore, and English hackamore, the reins attach to shanks (like bit shanks on a curb bit) that are attached between a noseband and a curb chain ... This is not a true hackamore, nor a modern bitless bridle, but rather is a hybrid between a cavesson and a bitted bridle ... from the headstall to the reins to add leverage, though with less force than the shanks of a mechanical hackamore ...
Types of Hackamores - Mechanical Hackamore
... A mechanical hackamore, sometimes called a hackamore bit,English hackamore or a brockamore, falls into the hackamore category only because it is a device ... However, it also uses shanks and leverage, thus it is not a true hackamore ... Mechanical hackamores lack the sophistication of bits or a bosal, cannot turn a horse easily, and primarily are used for their considerable stopping power ...

Famous quotes containing the word mechanical:

    A man should have a farm or a mechanical craft for his culture. We must have a basis for our higher accomplishments, our delicate entertainments of poetry and philosophy, in the work of our hands.
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