Masking

Masking can mean:

  • Applying or using a mask
  • Auditory masking, a class of sensory phenomena where the perception of one sound is affected by the presence of another sound
    • Temporal masking
    • Simultaneous masking
  • Backmasking, a recording technique in which a sound or message is recorded backward onto a track that is meant to be played forward
  • Backward masking in psychovisual or psychoacoustics
  • Masking (in art or microtechnology), protecting a selected area from change during production
  • Materials used to protect portions of a work from unintended change, such as masking tape, frisket, and stencils
  • Masking (illustration), an art technique that influences the intended perception of a character.
  • Mask (computing), AND'ing or OR'ing a bit pattern with another bit pattern to select some bits
  • Masking agent, a reagent used in chemical analysis which reacts with (thus sequestering) chemical species which may interfere in the analysis
  • Sound masking, the intentional introduction of background to improve comfort and privacy
  • Spectral mask, a method for reducing adjacent-channel interference in broadcast applications

Other articles related to "masking":

Auditory Filters
... the perception of a first tone by auditory masking ... Critical bands are also closely related to auditory masking phenomena – reduced audibility of a sound signal when in the presence of a second signal of higher intensity and within the same critical band ... Masking phenomena have wide implications, ranging from a complex relationship between loudness (perceptual frame of reference) and intensity (physical frame of reference ...
Anti-stuttering Devices - Altered Auditory Feedback Devices - Masking
... White noise masking has been well documented to reduce stuttering ... such as the Edinburgh Masker (since discontinued) have been developed to deliver masking, and found that masking was effective in reducing stuttering ... Interest in masking reduced during the 1980s as a result of studies finding delayed auditory feedback and frequency altered feedback were more effective in reducing ...
Simultaneous Masking - Lower Frequencies
... The masking pattern changes depending on the frequency of the masker and the intensity (figure B) ... This shows that there is a spread of the masking effect upward in frequency as the intensity of the masker is increased ... This flattening is called upward spread of masking and is why an interfering sound masks high frequency signals much better than low frequency signals ...
Lateral Masking
... Lateral masking is a problem for the human visual perception of identical or similar entities in close proximity ... In linguistics lateral masking refers to the interference a letter has on its neighbor ... Lateral masking is also a problem in orthography design ...
Domain Masking
... Domain Masking or URL Masking is the art of hiding the actual domain name of a website from the URL field of a user's web browser in favor of another name ... than the orignal URL/domain name.With masking the domain name it does not affect the content of the actual website, it only covers up the original URL ... Domain masking prevents users from being able to see the actual domain website, whether it be due to length or privacy/security issues ...

Famous quotes containing the word masking:

    Love, love, love—all the wretched cant of it, masking egotism, lust, masochism, fantasy under a mythology of sentimental postures, a welter of self-induced miseries and joys, blinding and masking the essential personalities in the frozen gestures of courtship, in the kissing and the dating and the desire, the compliments and the quarrels which vivify its barrenness.
    Germaine Greer (b. 1939)

    Love, love, love—all the wretched cant of it, masking egotism, lust, masochism, fantasy under a mythology of sentimental postures, a welter of self-induced miseries and joys, blinding and masking the essential personalities in the frozen gestures of courtship, in the kissing and the dating and the desire, the compliments and the quarrels which vivify its barrenness.
    Germaine Greer (b. 1939)

    We were that generation called “silent,” but we were silent neither, as some thought, because we shared the period’s official optimism nor, as others thought, because we feared its official repression. We were silent because the exhilaration of social action seemed to many of us just one more way of escaping the personal, of masking for a while that dread of the meaningless which was man’s fate.
    Joan Didion (b. 1935)