Mary Lou Ballweg

Mary Lou Ballweg is the president and executive director of the Endometriosis Association, an organization she cofounded in 1980 that promotes awareness of and education regarding the disease endometriosis. Besides founding and leading the Association, she has overseen the publication of the Association’s three books and its educational materials, an extensive body of literature on the disease, and the development of two million dollars-plus educational awareness campaigns, four public service announcement campaigns, and many other outreach efforts. She is editor of the Association's bimonthly newsletter and has produced numerous articles and chapters for journals, magazines, newsletters, and medical textbooks.

She helped establish the world’s first research registry for endometriosis. She was responsible for a major breakthrough in research in 1992 linking dioxin to endometriosis for the first time, helped develop groundbreaking work on cancer and endometriosis, and has an ongoing collaboration with the National Institutes of Health on research on autoimmune diseases and endometriosis. She was instrumental in establishing Association research programs at Dartmouth Medical School and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

Famous quotes containing the words mary and/or lou:

    He was high and mighty. But the kindest creature to his slaves—and the unfortunate results of his bad ways were not sold, had not to jump over ice blocks. They were kept in full view and provided for handsomely in his will. His wife and daughters in the might of their purity and innocence are supposed never to dream of what is as plain before their eyes as the sunlight, and they play their parts of unsuspecting angels to the letter.
    —Anonymous Antebellum Confederate Women. Previously quoted by Mary Boykin Chesnut in Mary Chesnut’s Civil War, edited by C. Vann Woodward (1981)

    We have got to stop the nervous Nellies and the Toms from going to the Man’s place. I don’t believe in killing, but a good whipping behind the bushes wouldn’t hurt them.... These bourgeoisie Negroes aren’t helping. It’s the ghetto Negroes who are leading the way.
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